How feng shui shaped Hong Kong's skyline

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  • Published on:  Wednesday, August 1, 2018
  • Hong Kong’s superstitious skyline.
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    Hong Kong’s famous skyline is known for its colorful lights and modern buildings, but a closer look reveals some unique designs inspired by feng shui. Like the gaping holes in the middle of buildings to let dragons fly through or cannon-like structures installed to deflect bad “qi” (pronounced chi).

    The main belief in feng shui is that destiny is bound to the environment, so good fortune and harmony can be invited in and bad energy can be warded off by arranging objects and buildings around us. It's an ancient Chinese practice that has come to define Hong Kong's skyline.

    In this episode of Borders, we explore feng shui principles, explain the circumstances that allowed it to flourish in Hong Kong and take a look at the unique designs around the city.

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  • Vox
    Vox  1 months ago +1125

    We should clarify that while construction firms have specifically cited feng shui as a motive for putting holes in their buildings, the unique design also has other purposes other than superstition, including heat ventilation and city code compliance. Feng shui is not always a factor in these design decisions but we did hope to show that the belief system has influenced architectural decisions in Hong Kong.

    • ROUFIANOS TOU STREFI
      ROUFIANOS TOU STREFI  3 days ago

      note thats its pronounced FEng sUe

    • 黃誠德
      黃誠德  20 days ago

      I find some other explanation.
      The first explanation is soothing heat island effect
      The second explanation is to beautify the "Refuge Floor"
      The last explanation is "plot ratios":
      This hole can be excluded from the floor area, so the other apartments can be built higher, (High-rise apartments are more expensive)

    • Konanan
      Konanan  25 days ago +1

      No Name you need to relax No Name. I think your feng shui might be disrupted.

    • SERGIO DURANYG
      SERGIO DURANYG  27 days ago

      It's nice you clarify this on the comment section, but in the video you actually make this asian people seem stupid for putting holes in their buildings juts to let "dragons pass trough"... I know it was intentional from you to keep (U.S.A) people engaged. But this make you all (Vox People) look dumb to people all over the world who knows the real purpose of the wholes in the building...

  • Ermin Mejremic
    Ermin Mejremic  2 days ago

    Lmfaoo dragons 🐉

  • voiceofseasons
    voiceofseasons  2 days ago

    So that is why it's so expensive to live in Hong Kong. Holes instead of rooms.

  • Bryan William
    Bryan William  4 days ago

    Chinese people who live in Indonesia also believe in Feng shui and affected their houses

  • Mr All Sunday
    Mr All Sunday  5 days ago

    nice chanel..complex information, less boring

  • F lung
    F lung  6 days ago

    Well, my grand uncle is the feng shui advisor to the governor of Hong Kong back then, and still serving Queen Elizabeth II today. They really paid millions each year to him, just hear some construction or interior design advises. My grand uncle told me that he doesn’t believe feng shui in a way like a religion, he thinks it isn’t scientific, but useful enough to call it a tool. And this is exactly the reason why feng shui has preserved and still practiced throughout the Chinese history.

  • Mt. me
    Mt. me  6 days ago

    Can't the dragons fly over or around the buildings lmao

  • Sonic Maurice Fase 4 the Hedgehog

    How to understand Feng Shui:Metaphor.

  • Matt Wood
    Matt Wood  11 days ago

    Why are you walking around “vlogging ”? Can Vox not afford to do a proper voiceover or interview? How does being out of breath and doing a Skyping-your-mom-POV make this video any more effective or entertaining?

  • Nox Kot
    Nox Kot  12 days ago

    Cant the dragons just fly over the buildings?

  • 0
    0  12 days ago

    Now, how is Hong Kong's lucky energy today? Is fungshui still benefits to it

  • CheeseTruffles
    CheeseTruffles  13 days ago

    3:00 Are you sure they're not just trying to kill the competition? hehe

  • An Leng Uy
    An Leng Uy  13 days ago

    Wish we have dragons in my country, too. Buildings here are ugly.

  • 林峻生
    林峻生  16 days ago

    The Cheung Kong Center, between the Bank of China and HSBC and owned by Li Ka Shing, the richest guy in Hong Kong , are said to have angled the building and exterior design that metaphors as armor to defend and reflect the damage of the two rivaling banks in order to protect their Feng Shui/ business

  • gastly boy
    gastly boy  19 days ago

    fucken scalies

  • Rohit Kumar
    Rohit Kumar  21 days ago

    That's Vaastu Shastra.

  • Vinit Patel
    Vinit Patel  22 days ago +1

    Pretty sure that the dragons can just fly over the skyline

  • Goobye USA
    Goobye USA  22 days ago

    Chinese government needs to send troops in and beat the crap out of any Hong Kong protestors. HONG KONG = CHINA

  • TheCoper COper
    TheCoper COper  22 days ago

    And that's why superstitious bullshit has no place in modern world.

  • Yag Shemash
    Yag Shemash  23 days ago

    Retarded Hong Kongers! They desperately need a Maoist Cultural Revolution to finish off with this backwards medieval practice...and with capitalism!